Showing posts with label Prehistoric animals still alive.. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Prehistoric animals still alive.. Show all posts

Silverfish, prehistoric animal still alive.


All prehistoric animal lovers, we like to discover that, although not a Megalodon or a giant short-faced bear, we can delight with the observation of a tiny prehistoric animals still alive, a being that has not changed for 400 million years and for more joy, it is possible that we have at home.

These animals are called silverfish, fishmoths, carpet sharks or paramites, and are on earth so long ago that saw come and go trilobites, Dunkleosteus, at the very Hurdia Victoria, the well-known T-Rex and even our ancestors like Australopithecus.

This is a prehistoric animal in wingless insects have a long, excluding its limbs, about an inch.
Its metallic luster of the body is due to its silvery scales, which appear after the third molt.

He lives in damp and dark, most often in older buildings, or between books and papers at home.

They feed on carbohydrates such as starch or other polysaccharides. They can also digest cellulose, textiles drilling starch, sugar, hair, dandruff, dirt and mildew, books, cotton, linen, silk, including artificial silk, dead insects or even its own exuvia (shed skin) and mites.
Driven by famine, a silverfish may even indulge skin with clothing (leather) and some fabrics made with synthetic fibers. However, like many insects, is capable of interrupting their vital activity for several months without appreciable harm.




His top predator are earwigs, house centipedes and spiders




Anyway, I personally think that seeing this animal is a privilege and a gift, it is also harmless to humans (not like cockroaches), and I find it funny when turning on a light or stop run to the small, dark recesses the bathroom ... Probably been that way (hide and seek food in the dark) and have survived so many predators, so many changes in climate, so many disasters, wars and so many years. So next time you see one and go to step on it, think that this is a prehistoric animal.

Coelacanth


Pre-dating the dinosaurs by millions of years and once thought to have gone extinct with them, 65 million years ago but....

Although now represented by only two known living species, as a group the coelacanths were once very successful with many genera and species that left an abundant fossil record from the Devonian to the end of the Cretaceous period, at which point they apparently suffered a nearly complete extinction. It is often claimed that the coelacanth has remained unchanged for millions of years, but, in fact, the living species and even genus are unknown from the fossil record. However, some of the extinct species, particularly those of the last known fossil coelacanth, the Cretaceous genus Macropoma, closely resemble the living species.[citation needed] The most likely reason for the gap is the taxon having become extinct in shallow waters. Deep-water fossils are only rarely lifted to levels where paleontologists can recover them, making most deep-water taxa disappear from the fossil record. This situation is still under investigation by scientists.


They first appeared in the fossil record in the Middle Devonian.[4] Prehistoric species of coelacanth lived in many bodies of water in Late Paleozoic and Mesozoic times.

Coelacanths, are lobe-finned fish with the pectoral and anal fins on fleshy stalks supported by bones, and the tail or caudal fin diphycercal (divided into three lobes), the middle one of which also includes a continuation of the notochord. Coelacanths have modified cosmoid scales, which are thinner than true cosmoid scales. Coelacanths also have a special electroreceptive device called a rostral organ in the front of the skull, which probably helps in prey detection. The small device also could help the balance of the fish, as echolocation could be a factor in the way this fish moves.

The average weight of the living West Indian Ocean coelacanth, Latimeria chalumnae, is 80 kg (176 lb), and they can reach up to 2 m (6.5 ft) in length. Adult females are slightly larger than males. Based on growth rings in their ear bones (otoliths), scientists infer that individual coelacanths may live as long as 80 to 100 years. Coelacanths live as deep as 700 m (2300 ft) below sea level, but are more commonly found at depths of 90 to 200 m.

Coelacanth this one near Ichthyostega ( prehistoric animals), the first fish that emerged the superfcie.

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